All Women Should Watch Out For These Itchy, Irritation And Burning Bumps Inside Their Private Areas

Vestibular papillomatosis (VP) is a cutaneous condition of the vulva, characterized by pink, asymptomatic, fine projections of the vestibular epithelium or labia minora.

It is the female equivalent to hirsuties coronae glandis.

It is often thought to be a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, but several studies have shown that the condition is not viral and is not a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

Vulvar vestibular papillomatosis is an anatomical variant of the vulva. In a prevalence study in London, UK, one per cent of women showed vestibular papillomatosis.

Other authors found prevalence rates between 5.1 to 33%. From our experience with a multidisciplinary vulva clinic, the rate seems to be around 5% (unpublished observation).

Due to its 'wart like' appearance, it is sometimes misdiagnosed as genital warts. This often leads to unwarranted and aggressive investigations and therapy.

Therefore, dermatologists should be familiar with this condition. Vulvar vestibular papillomatosis can be considered the female equivalent of pearly penile papules.

Facts about Vestibular papillomatosis:

According to DNA studies have shown that any relation to HPV is purely coincidental (as a high percentage of the sexually active population has or has had HPV).

Vestibular papillomatosis is not transmittable or pathological. HPV will turn white upon a vinegar application test, and vestibular papillomatosis will not.

Additionally, HPV occurs in cauliflower-like clusters at the base, whereas Vestibular papillomatosis does not.

It’s important to know that vestibular papillomatosis isn’t a sexually transmitted disease (STD). You can’t catch it from or pass it on to someone else.

Vestibular papillomatosis isn’t caused by having sex or poor hygiene. However, keeping your vaginal area clean may help keep it from getting worse.

It’s usually painless, and you may not even know you have it. Often, vestibular papillomatosis is found when you see your doctor for other unrelated symptoms, such as pain or vaginal discharge, or for a routine physical examination. Most women have no symptoms from vestibular papillomatosis.

Treatment options:

1. If it doesn’t bother you, you will be asked by the doctor to observe the condition first. However, for patients who are self-conscious, they would recommend acid treatments to burn the papules. It is done by the doctor himself and may cause mild discomfort. The procedure will be repeated until the papules are all gone.

2. If the bumps bother you a lot or interfere with sexual intercourse, your doctor can remove them with a simple procedure, but they sometimes just come back.

The most important things to remember if you’re diagnosed with vestibular papillomatosis are:

• It’s benign and isn’t and won’t turn into cancer.
• It isn’t an STD, so it can’t be picked up or passed on during sex.

Important Reminder:

Even it is not easy to pass to one another, it is important to be careful concerning specially to our body and health. As the saying goes, prevention is better than cure.